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Kristina McElheran

Kristina McElheran

Digital Fellow

Kristina McElheran is an assistant professor of Strategic Management at the University of Toronto.

Her research centers on the use of information technology and data by firms, with an emphasis on strategy, organizational design, and process innovation. Her current focus is on data-driven decision making and how firms and individuals can use data to improve their performance. She is also actively investigating the economic and strategic impacts of cloud computing.

Kristina’s experience includes six years on the Harvard Business School faculty, as well as serving as a digital fellow at the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy since 2013. She splits her time between Rotman, MIT, and the University of Toronto, Scarborough, where she teaches strategic management. 

Prior to her academic career, Kristina worked for two early-stage technology ventures in Silicon Valley. She currently serves as a lab economist at the Creative Destruction Lab, one of Toronto’s premier seed-stage programs for technology startups. 

Kristina’s work has been featured in Management Science, the American Economic Review, the Journal of Economics and Management Strategy, the Harvard Business Review, Sloan Management Review, Forbes, Rotman Magazine, and Communications of the ACM.

 
Christos Makridis

Christos Makridis

Digital Fellow

Christos Makridis is a computational social scientist, policy adviser, and entrepreneur with doctorates from Stanford University in Economics and Management Science & Engineering.

His academic research is concentrated in the intersection of the digital economy, labor markets, and human flourishing with a special focus on understanding how individuals accumulate skills over their careers and the effects of policies on the incentives to learn. 

In addition to his academic research, Christos publishes frequently in the media, including Fox News, Real Clear Policy, The Hill, and Quillette. He also writes a column for Forbes. 

Christos has served on the White House Council of Economic Advisers and currently serves as a senior research adviser for the National Artificial Intelligence Institute in the Department of Veterans Affairs. He is also a research professor at Arizona State University, a senior adviser at Gallup, a digital fellow in the Initiative on the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy, a non-resident fellow at the Institute for Religious Studies at Baylor University, and a visiting fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

 
Hilary Mason

Hilary Mason

Digital Fellow

Hilary Mason is a data scientist in residence at Accel, where she has the opportunity to advise companies large and small on their data strategies. She spent four years as chief scientist at bitly, where she led a team that studied attention on the internet in realtime—incorporating a mix of research, exploration, and engineering. Hilary also co-founded HackNY, a non-profit that helps talented engineering students find their way into the startup community of creative technologists in New York City.

Affiliations

  • Founder, Fast Forward Labs
 
Geoffrey G. Parker

Geoffrey G. Parker

Digital Fellow

Geoffrey Parker is a professor of engineering at Dartmouth College where he also serves as Director of the Master of Engineering Management Program.

Prior to joining Dartmouth, Geoff was a professor of business at Tulane University. He is also a research fellow at MIT’s Initiative for the Digital Economy where he leads platform industry research studies and co-chairs the annual MIT Platform Strategy Summit.

Geoff has made significant contributions to the field of network economics and strategy as co-developer of the theory of “two-sided” markets. He is co-author of the book, Platform Revolution. His current research includes studies of platform business strategy, data governance, smart cities and energy systems, financial services, and electronic healthcare record systems.

Geoff’s research has been funded by grants from the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, the states of Louisiana and New York, and numerous corporations.  He serves or has served as department editor and associate editor at multiple journals and as a National Science Foundation panelist. Parker won the Thinkers50 2019 Digital Thinking Award, along with Marshall Van Alstyne, for the concepts of the inverted firm, two-sided markets, and how firms can adapt and thrive in a platform economy.

Geoff is a frequent keynote speaker and advises senior leaders on their organizations’ platform strategies. Before attending MIT, he held positions in engineering and finance at GE Semiconductor and GE Healthcare.

Geoff received a B.S.E. from Princeton and M.S. and Ph.D. from MIT. You can find more information about Geoff at Google Scholar.

Affiliations

  • Dartmouth Professor of Engineering
  • Director, Master of Engineering Management Program, Dartmouth
 
Georgios Petropoulos

Georgios Petropoulos

Digital Fellow

Georgios’ research focuses on the implications of digital technologies on innovation, competition policy, and labor markets.

He is currently studying the regulation of digital platforms and the relationship between big data and market competition. His research also focuses on how the adoption of robots and information technologies affect labor markets and firms’ market returns. 

Georgios is also a post-doctoral researcher at MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy and a research fellow at Bruegel, an economics think tank based in Brussels.

He holds a bachelor degree in physics, master’s degrees in mathematical economics and econometrics, and a PhD degree in economics.

 
Shachar Reichman

Shachar Reichman

Digital Fellow

Dr. Shachar Reichman is the Head of the Technology and Information Management Department at Tel Aviv University, Coller School of Management.

His research focuses on applying modern ML and data science algorithms to identify unique and interesting structures in data from online and offline environments, to improve consumer experience and business performance. In particular, Shachar’s research seeks to understand and quantify how the vast quantities of data generated through online and offline activities, including posts in online social networks, user-generated content, online search logs and transaction records, can be used to better understand consumption decisions, enhance predictive models aimed at supporting decision-making processes, and optimize business strategies to improve business productivity and efficiency.

His prior research has been published in Journal of Marketing Research, Operations Research, MISQ, Management Science, and Proceedings of ICIS. He received his Ph.D. from Tel Aviv University School of Management and was a Post-Doctoral Associate at MIT Sloan School. He holds B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in industrial engineering from Ben-Gurion University.

 
Daniel Rock

Daniel Rock

Digital Fellow

Daniel Rock is an assistant professor in the Operations, Information, and Decisions Department at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

He is also a postdoctoral researcher at the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy. 

Daniel’s research focuses on the impact that technology has on workers, firms, markets, and the economy. His work demonstrates how new digital technologies and intangible assets are an increasingly important component of economic activity. 

In this environment, investment in data assets, machine learning and artificial intelligence, and technological human capital are critical margins for firm competition and social change. Further, as the set of tasks which can be done by different technologies expands, workers are faced with uncertain decisions about which skills to acquire. In his research, Rock measures and explains how these trends are evolving. 

Daniel has collaborated with the LinkedIn Economic Graph Research team, as well as a major U.S. Stock Exchange to measure the effects of new data products on market performance.

 
Marshall Van Alstyne

Marshall Van Alstyne

Digital Fellow

Marshall Van Alstyne is one of the leading experts in network business models.

He conducts research on information economics, covering such topics as communications markets, the economics of networks, intellectual property, social effects of technology, and productivity effects of information. As co-developer of the concept of “two-sided networks,” Marshall has been a major contributor to the theory of network effects, a set of ideas now taught worldwide. His co-authored article on the subject is a Harvard Business Review top 50 of all time.

Awards include two patents, National Science Foundation IOC, SGER, SBIR, iCorp and Career Awards, and eight best paper awards. His articles and commentary have appeared in Science, Nature, Management Science, Harvard Business Review, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal.

Affiliations

  • Boston University Questrom Professor in Management
  • Professor, Information Systems
 
Xiupeng Wang

Xiupeng Wang

Digital Fellow

Xiupeng Wang’s primary research interest is labor economics with a focus on the relationship between technology advances and  labor market dynamics.

His other interests include public policy, industrial organization, macroeconomics, and the economics of science and engineering. 

Prior to earning his PhD, Xiupeng earned a Master of Science in physics from New Jersey Institute of Technology.

 
Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Digital Fellow

Dr. Irving Wladawsky-Berger is a research affiliate at MIT’s Sloan School of
Management and a fellow of MIT’s Initiative on the Digital Economy and MIT Connection Science.

He retired from IBM in May of 2007 after a 37-year career with the company, where his primary focus was on innovation and technical strategy. He led a number of IBM’s companywide initiatives including the Internet, Supercomputing, and Linux. He’s been Adviser on Digital Strategy and Innovation at Citigroup, at HBO, and at MasterCard; adjunct professor at the Imperial College Business School; and a guest columnist at the Wall Street Journal’s CIO Journal.

Dr. Wladawsky-Berger was co-chair of the President’s Information Technology Advisory Committee, and a founding member of the Computer Sciences and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. A native of Cuba, he was named the 2001 Hispanic Engineer of the Year. Dr. Wladawsky-Berger received an M.S. and a Ph. D. in physics from the University of Chicago.

Since 2005, Irving has been writing a weekly blog, irvingwb.com

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