Stanford University
 
Fei-Fei Li

Fei-Fei Li

Affiliated Faculty

Dr. Fei-Fei Li is the inaugural Sequoia Professor in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University, and Co-Director of Stanford’s Human-Centered AI Institute.

She served as the Director of Stanford’s AI Lab from 2013 to 2018.

During her sabbatical from Stanford from January 2017 to September 2018, Fei-Fei was vice president at Google and served as chief scientist of AI/ML at Google Cloud.

Fei-Fei’s current research interests include cognitively inspired AI, machine learning, deep learning, computer vision, and AI+healthcare—particularly ambient intelligent systems for healthcare delivery. Her past research focused on cognitive and computational neuroscience.

She is the inventor of ImageNet and the ImageNet Challenge, a critical large-scale dataset and benchmarking effort that has contributed to the latest developments in deep learning and AI. She is a national leading voice for advocating diversity in STEM and AI, and is co-founder and chairperson of the national non-profit AI4ALL, which aims to increase inclusion and diversity in AI education.


“AI won’t replace managers, but managers who use AI will replace those who don’t.”

Fei-Fei Li

Fei-Fei Li


Fei-Fei has published more than 200 scientific articles in top-tier journals and conferences, including Nature, PNAS, Journal of Neuroscience, CVPR, ICCV, NIPS, ECCV, ICRA, IROS, RSS, IJCV, IEEE-PAMI, New England Journal of Medicine, and Nature Digital Medicine. 

Fei-Fei received her B.A. degree in physics from Princeton in 1999 with high honors, and her PhD degree in electrical engineering from California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in 2005. She joined Stanford in 2009 as an assistant professor. Prior to that, she was on faculty at Princeton University (2007-2009) and University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (2005-2006).

Affiliations

Fireside Chat with Gina Raimondo: AI & The Future of Work Conference

HAI co-director Fei-Fei Li talks with Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo at the AI & The Future of Work Conference, October 2020.

 
Gregory J. Martin

Gregory J. Martin

Affiliated Faculty

Gregory J. Martin is Assistant Professor of Political Economics at Stanford Graduate School of Business.

He previously held a faculty position in the department of Political Science at Emory University. His research focuses on political marketplaces, including the market for political news, the political media consulting industry, and the allocation of grant funding by legislatures. Gregory earned his Ph.D. in political economics at Stanford GSB and an SB in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Affiliations

  • Assistant Professor of Political Economy, Stanford Graduate School of Business
 
Paul Milgrom

Paul Milgrom

Affiliated Faculty

Paul Milgrom is the Shirley and Leonard Ely professor of Humanities and Sciences in the Department of Economics at Stanford University and professor, by courtesy, at both the Department of Management Science and Engineering and the Graduate School of Business.

In 2020, Paul was named a Distinguished Fellow of the American Economic Association. According to the Distinguished Fellow citation, he “is the world’s leading auction designer, having helped design many of the auctions for radio spectrum conducted around the world in the last thirty years, including those conducted by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (ranging from the original simultaneous multiple round auction with activity rules, to the recent incentive auction for repurposing broadcast spectrum for modern uses). His applied work in auction design and consulting has established new ways for economists to interact with the wider world. He is also a theorist of extraordinary breadth, who has provided (and still continues to provide) foundational insights not only into the theory of auctions (including his 1982 paper with Weber), but across the range of modern microeconomic theory.”

Continuing, the citation notes that “His work has been widely recognized. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has received major prizes, including the 2008 Nemmers Prize, the 2012 BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award, the 2014 Golden Goose Award (with McAfee and Wilson), the 2018 CME Group-MSRI Prize in Innovative Quantitative Applications, and the 2018 John J. Carty Award for the Advancement of Science (with Kreps and Wilson). He is the dissertation advisor of many successful economists.”

Affiliations

  • Shirley R. and Leonard W. Ely, Jr. Professor of Humanities and Sciences, Senior Fellow at SIEPR
  • Professor, by courtesy, of Economics at the Graduate School of Business and of Management Science and Engineering
 
Harikesh Nair

Harikesh Nair

Affiliated Faculty

Harikesh S. Nair is the Jonathan B. Lovelace Professor of Marketing at Stanford GSB.

Harikesh’s research is in marketing analytics and computational social science. His research brings together social science theory, statistical tools, and marketing data to better understand consumer behavior and to improve the strategic marketing decisions of firms. This work speaks to the challenges and opportunities firms face as they transition to a world where marketing becomes a data-oriented, algorithmically-driven business function.

Affiliations

  • The Jonathan B. Lovelace Professor of Marketing. Stanford Graduate School of Business
 
Paul Oyer

Paul Oyer

Affiliated Faculty

Paul Oyer studies the economics of organizations and human resource practices.

His work examines the use of broad-based stock option plans and how firms use non-cash benefits and respond to limits on their ability to displace workers. He also explores how labor market conditions affect their entire careers when MBAs and PhD economists leave school.

Paul’s current projects include studies of the gig economy and a study of how people’s backgrounds determine their decision to become an entrepreneur, as well as the success of ventures that they pursue.

Affiliations

  • The Mary and Rankine Van Anda Entrepreneurial Professor and Professor of Economics Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Senior Fellow, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research
 
Rob Reich

Rob Reich

Affiliated Faculty

Rob Reich is professor of political science and, by courtesy, professor of philosophy and at the Graduate School of Education, at Stanford University.

He is the director of the Center for Ethics in Society and co-director of the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society (publisher of the Stanford Social Innovation Review), both at Stanford University. He is the author most recently of Just Giving: Why Philanthropy is Failing Democracy and How It Can Do Better (Princeton University Press, 2018) and Philanthropy in Democratic Societies: History, Institutions, Values (edited with Chiara Cordelli and Lucy Bernholz, University of Chicago Press, 2016). He is also the author of several books on education: Bridging Liberalism and Multiculturalism in American Education (University of Chicago Press, 2002) and Education, Justice, and Democracy (edited with Danielle Allen, University of Chicago Press, 2013).

Rob’s current work focuses on ethics, public policy, and technology, and he serves as associate director of the Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence initiative at Stanford. He is the recipient of multiple teaching awards, including the Walter J. Gores award, Stanford’s highest honor for teaching. Reich was a sixth grade teacher at Rusk Elementary School in Houston, Texas before attending graduate school. He is a board member of the magazine Boston Review, of Giving Tuesday, and at the Spencer Foundation.

Rob is a sought-after public speaker and writes frequently for a general audience in publications such as The New York TimesWashington Post, Wired, and Chronicle of Philanthropy. See more of his public appearances on the Just Giving page.

Affiliations

  • Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, Stanford Graduate School of Education, Stanford Center for Ethics in Society, Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society
 
Gregory Rosston

Gregory Rosston

Affiliated Faculty

Gregory Rosston is director of the Public Policy program at Stanford University, the Gordon Cain Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, and professor of economics (by courtesy).

He teaches economics and public policy courses on competition policy and strategy, economic policy analysis, and writing and rhetoric. 

Gregory served as deputy chief economist at the Federal Communications Commission working on the implementation of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 and helped to design and implement the first ever spectrum auctions in the United States. In 2011, he served as Senior Economist for Transactions for the Federal Communications Commission for the proposed AT&T-T-Mobile transaction. He co-chaired the Economy, Globalization and Trade committee for the 2008 Obama campaign and was a member of the Obama transition team on economic agency review and energy policy. He also served as a member and co-chair of the Department of Commerce Spectrum Management Advisory Committee from 2010 – 2014.

Gregory has written extensively on the application of economics to telecommunications issues. He has advised companies and governments regarding auctions in the United States and other countries and served as a consultant to various organizations including the World Bank and the Federal Communications Commission, and as a board member and advisor to high technology, financial, and startup companies in the areas of auctions, business strategy, antitrust and regulation. He serves as chairman of the board of the Stanford Federal Credit Union, as a board member of the Nepal Youth Foundation, and as an advisory board member of Sustainable Conservation and the Technology Policy Institute.

Gregory received his PhD in economics from Stanford University and his A.B. with honors in economics from University of California at Berkeley.

Affiliations

  • Gordon Cain Senior Fellow, SIEPR Director, Public Policy Program, and Professor of Economics (by courtesy)
 
Gopi Shah Goda

Gopi Shah Goda

Affiliated Faculty

Gopi Shah Goda is a senior fellow and the deputy director at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR) at Stanford University.

Gopi is also a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a fellow of the Society of Actuaries. As the institute’s deputy director, Gopi works closely with the director in developing and articulating the institute’s strategic priorities while overseeing its academic programs and its operations.

Affiliations

  • Senior Fellow, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR)
 
Kathryn Shaw

Kathryn Shaw

Affiliated Faculty

Kathryn Shaw is the Ernest C. Arbuckle Professor of Economics at the Stanford Graduate School of Business and a senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.

In recent work, Shaw evaluates the importance of bosses in improving the productivity of their subordinates. She (and her co-authors) show that a good boss can markedly improve his subordinate’s productivity now and into the future as the worker moves on. Shaw has also developed an interest in entrepreneurship, showing that serial entrepreneurs develop intangible capital that they take with them as they move from their first firm to a new more productive firm. In earlier work that has been published in the American Economic Review and Management Science, she and her colleagues evaluate the effectiveness of complementary teamwork practices in the steel industry. She has also focused on the performance gains from new information technologies and the changes in management strategy towards product customization that enhance returns to investment. In related work on incentives in franchising, she shows how the optimal use of franchise contracts can increase brand value for franchise companies. Her research has been extensively funded by the National Science Foundation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Russell Sage and Rockefeller Foundations, and the Department of Labor.

In 2001, Shaw received the Columbia University award for the best paper on international business, and in 1998, she was honored as the recipient of the Minnesota Award for Employment Research for the best paper in 1997-98 on the topic of employment issues. She held a Stanford Graduate School of Business Trust Faculty Fellow in 2005-2006. She has been the recipient of the Xerox Research Chair, has served on a Research Panel of the NSF, and was an Editor of the Review of Economics and Statistics. At Carnegie Mellon University, Shaw received the Award for Sustained Teaching Excellence, the Economics Department Teaching Award, was Chair of the Faculty Senate and was Head of the Department of Industrial Management.

Affiliations

  • Professor of Economics at the Graduate School of Business, Stanford University.

 
Ramin Toloui

Ramin Toloui

Affiliated Faculty

Ramin Toloui is Professor of the Practice of International Finance and the Tad and Dianne Taube Policy Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.

His research and teaching are focused on global markets and international economic cooperation, prevention and management of financial crises, and the impact of technological change on economic and financial stability.

Prior to joining Stanford, Ramin had a two-decade career spanning investment management and public service. Most recently, he served as the Assistant Secretary for International Finance at the U.S. Treasury Department from 2014 through 2017, where he was responsible for international monetary affairs, global financial markets, coordination with the G-7/G-20, and regional and bilateral economic issues. During his tenure, Ramin played a key role in shaping the U.S. government’s approaches to navigating Ukraine’s financial crisis, sanctions on Russia, threats to Eurozone financial stability, Brexit, and China’s foreign exchange and market volatility.

In addition to advising the Secretary of the Treasury and other senior U.S. officials, he served as an emissary during crises and negotiated agreements with foreign finance ministries, central banks, and international financial institutions such as the International Monetary Fund. Ramin also worked with Congress to successfully advance initiatives such as loan guarantees to promote U.S. foreign policy priorities in the Middle East and Ukraine.

Affiliations

  • Tad and Dianne Taube Policy Fellow & Professor of the Practice, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR)
Stanford University