Stanford University
 
Zanele Munyikwa

Zanele Munyikwa

Graduate Research Affiliate

Zanele Munyikwa is a PhD student in Management Science and Information Technology at MIT Sloan.

Zanele graduated from Duke University in 2015, where she was a Reginaldo Howard Memorial Scholar, with a B.S. in computer science. She has also studied at the University of Delaware, University College London, and Stanford University. 

Her previous engineering roles include computer networking research, Android and iOS development, natural language processing research, and data mining and analysis.

 
Lindsey Raymond

Lindsey Raymond

Graduate Research Affiliate

Lindsey Raymond is a PhD candidate in the Technological Innovation, Growth and Strategic Management Group at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

Her research interests include economics of innovation, the digital economy, and applications of machine learning in economics.

 
Sebastian Steffen

Sebastian Steffen

Graduate Research Affiliate

Sebastian Steffen is a Ph.D. candidate at the MIT Sloan in the Information Technologies (IT) group, a subgroup of the Management Science program.

His research interests center on the effects of technology on society—specifically, the effects of automation on labor market outcomes and the acquisition of skills and human capital.

Before joining MIT in 2016, Sebastian served as research assistant for Susan Athey and Markus Mobius at the Microsoft Research New England Lab and worked on several projects, including the Impact of News Aggregators on Internet News Consumption and the Indonesian Celebrity Immunization Twitter Experiment. 

He also served as a data science intern with LinkedIn’s Economic Graph team and continues to study how career paths and labor mobility have changed over time with the team.

 
Hong-Yi TuYe

Hong-Yi TuYe

Graduate Research Affiliate

Hong-Yi TuYe is a PhD student at MIT Sloan with interests in industrial organization, antitrust, and technology.

He was previously a pre-doctoral fellow at SIEPR, advised by professors David Chan and Maria Polyakova.

Hong-Yi completed his undergraduate studies in economics at Columbia University and holds a masters in computational statistics and machine learning from University College London.

 
Anthony David Weng

Anthony David Weng

Research Assistant

Anthony David Weng is a senior at Stanford University studying economics and computer science. He’s interested in leveraging computing power and algorithmic thinking to improve our understanding of strategic games and fundamental macroeconomic forces.

 
Charlie Perry

Charlie Perry

Undergraduate Research Assistant

Charlie Perry is a junior at Stanford University studying economics and data science. His interests focus on the intersection between technology and economics.

 
Nicholas Verzic

Nicholas Verzic

Intern

Nicholas Verzic is a student at The University of Texas at Austin. His research interests focus on the application of artificial intelligence and machine learning in economics and robotics. Before his research affiliateship at the Stanford Digital Economy Lab, he was an extended intern at the NASA Ames Research Center Intelligent Robotics Group and the Technology Transfer Division.

 
Ruhani Walia

Ruhani Walia

Research Intern

Ruhani Walia is passionate about how we can use economic thinking, data, and emerging technologies to enact social good. Excited by the knowledge gaps existing in the fields of human behavior and technology, she has worked on projects involving blockchain to grant women more economic autonomy and co-founded a non-profit to distribute a life-saving drug in Nigeria.

Prior to joining the Lab, Ruhani was an innovation intern at Interac, where she completed projects in open banking and consumer preferences. She also worked at The Decision Lab, a behavior-science-based consulting firm, where she encountered many interesting applications of behavioral insights.Currently, she is studying economics at the University of Toronto as a National Scholar and is researching behavioral economics and prosocial decision-making.

Stanford University