Stanford University
 
Susan Athey

Susan Athey

Affiliated Faculty

Susan Athey’s research focuses on the areas of industrial organization, microeconomic theory, and applied econometrics.

Her current research also focuses on the design of auction-based marketplaces and the economics of the internet, primarily on online advertising and the economics of the news media. In addition, Susan has studied dynamic mechanisms and games with incomplete information, comparative statics under uncertainty, and econometric methods for analyzing auction models.

Affiliations

  • The Economics of Technology Professor Professor of Economics (by courtesy)
  • School of Humanities and Sciences Senior Fellow
  • Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Researcher

 
Nicholas Bloom

Nicholas Bloom

Affiliated Faculty

Nick Bloom’s research interests focus on measuring and explaining management practices across firms and countries.

His research includes collecting data from thousands of manufacturing firms, retailers, schools and hospitals across countries to develop a quantitative basis for management research. Recently, Nick has also been running management field experiments in India to identify clearly causal links between management and performance.

Another prominent area of Nick’s research focuses on the causes and consequences of uncertainty arising from events such as the credit crunch, the 9/11 terrorist attack, and the Cuban Missile Crisis. 

Nick also researches how innovation and IT affects tax, trade, and regulation.

 
Mark Duggan

Mark Duggan

Affiliated Faculty

Mark Duggan is The Trione Director of SIEPR and The Wayne and Jodi Cooperman Professor of Economics at Stanford University.

He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering at MIT in 1992 and 1994, respectively, and his Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University in 1999. He is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and serves on the editorial board of the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy.

Before arriving at Stanford in the summer of 2014, Duggan served as the Rowan Family Foundation Professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School and was also the faculty director of the Penn Wharton Public Policy Initiative and the chair of Wharton’s Business Economics and Public Policy Department.

Affiliations

  • The Trione Director and Senior Fellow Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR)
  • The Wayne and Jodi Cooperman Professor Department of Economics
 
Charles Eesley

Charles Eesley

Affiliated Faculty

Chuck Eesley is an Associate Professor and W.M. Keck Foundation Faculty Scholar in the Department of Management Science and Engineering at Stanford University.

As part of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program, his research focuses on the role of the institutional and university environment in high-growth, technology entrepreneurship. His research focuses on rethinking how the educational and policy environment shapes the economic and entrepreneurial impact of university alumni.

His field research spans China, Japan, Chile, Bangladesh, Thailand and Silicon Valley and has received awards from the Schulze Foundation, the Technical University of Munich, and the Kauffman Foundation.

Chuck is a faculty affiliate at the Stanford Center for International Development, the Woods Institute for the Environment and the Stanford King Center on Global Development. He is also a member of the editorial board for the Strategic Management Journal.

Affiliations

  • Associate Professor and W.M. Keck Foundation Faculty Scholar in the Department of Management Science and Engineering, Stanford University
 
Kathleen Eisenhardt

Kathleen Eisenhardt

Affiliated Faculty

Kathleen Eisenhardt is the Stanford W. Ascherman M.D. Professor and a faculty member in the Stanford Technology Ventures Program.

Her recent book (with Don Sull), Simple Rules: How to Survive in a Complex World, explores how simplicity tames complexity in business, life, and nature. She is also co-author (with Shona Brown) of Competing on the Edge: Strategy as Structured Chaos, winner of the George R. Terry Book Award for outstanding contribution to management thinking and an Amazon Top 10 Annual Business and Investing book. Kathleen is also author of over 100 articles in research and business journals, and the first author featured in Harvard Business Review’s OnPoint collection. She has been a Distinguished Visiting Professor with Insead’s Entrepreneurship and Family Enterprise area.

Affiliations

  • Stanford W. Ascherman, M.D. Professor in the School of Engineering, Management Science and Engineering

 
John Etchemendy

John Etchemendy

Affiliated Faculty

John Etchemendy is Provost, Emeritus, the Patrick Suppes Family Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, and the Denning Family Co-Director of HAI.

Affiliations

  • Provost Emeritus and Patrick Suppes Family Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Stanford University
  • Denning Co-Director, Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence
 
Matthew Gentzkow

Matthew Gentzkow

Affiliated Faculty

Matthew Gentzkow is a Professor of Economics at Stanford University. He studies applied microeconomics with a focus on media industries. He received the 2014 John Bates Clark Medal, given by the American Economic Association to the American economist under the age of forty who has made the most significant contribution to economic thought and knowledge. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Econometric Society, a senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, and a former co-editor of American Economic Journal: Applied Economics. Other awards include the 2016 Calvó-Armengol International Prize, the Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, grants from the National Science Foundation, National Institutes for Health, and Sloan Foundation, and a Faculty Excellence Award for teaching. He studied at Harvard University where he earned a bachelor’s degree in 1997, a master’s degree in 2002, and a Ph.D. in 2004.

Affiliations

  • Landau Professor in Technology and the Economy

 
Ramesh Johari

Ramesh Johari

Affiliated Faculty

Ramesh Johari is broadly interested in the design, economic analysis, and operation of online platforms, as well as statistical and machine learning techniques used by these platforms, such as search, recommendation, matching, and pricing algorithms.

Affiliations

  • Professor of Management Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering
 
Riitta Katila

Riitta Katila

Affiliated Faculty

Riitta Katila is Professor of Management Science & Engineering and W.M. Keck Foundation Faculty Scholar at Stanford University, and research director of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program.

Her research focuses on the intersection of technology strategy and organizational learning by using machine learning, statistical analysis, and mixed methods. She is an expert on innovation, competition, and entrepreneurship in large firms. Her current research centers on responsible and inclusive innovation initiatives.

Affiliations

  • Professor, Management Science & Engineering, Co-Director, Stanford Technology Ventures Program
 
Brad Larsen

Brad Larsen

Affiliated Faculty

Brad Larsen is an assistant professor of economics at Stanford University.

Brad Larsen joined the Department of Economics at Stanford University in 2014. Prior to this, he obtained a BA in Economics and BS in Mathematics from Brigham Young University and a PhD in Economics from MIT, and spent one year as postdoctoral researcher at eBay Research. He is also a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a Faculty Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. He is currently a W. Glenn Campbell and Rita Ricardo-Campbell National Fellow at the Hoover Institution. 

His primary area of research is Industrial Organization, with specific emphasis on bargaining and occupational licensing. His recent research projects study large datasets of alternating-offer-negotiation settings to analyze behavioral patterns and efficiency in bargaining. He also studies the effects of occupational licensing regulations on market outcomes such as prices, competition, and the distribution of service quality. Other recent projects study auctions, consumer search, digital copyright law and grey-market activity, changes in US wage inequality due to increased import competition with China, the effects of laws legitimizing arbitrage (parallel importation) across international markets, and applied econometric methods. 

Affiliations

NBER
SIEPR
Hoover Institution
IRiSS

Stanford University